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Conservation Plastering – Lime Plastering

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What is Lime Plastering?
Lime plaster provides an authentic finish that matches the historic character of older buildings. Its natural appearance and texture are often preferred for conservation projects to maintain the original look and feel of the structure.

Lime plastering involves the application of a lime-based mixture to walls and ceilings. This ancient technique has been used for thousands of years to finish and protect interior surfaces. Lime plaster is typically made from a blend of lime (either hydraulic or non-hydraulic), sand, and water. Traditional lime plaster can also include reinforcing fibers, such as animal hair, to improve its strength and adhesion.

Lime plastering is a vital technique in the conservation of historic buildings. Its breathability, compatibility with traditional materials, flexibility, durability, aesthetic value, and environmental benefits make it the preferred choice for preserving and restoring heritage structures. By using lime plaster, conservators can ensure the long-term health and beauty of these irreplaceable buildings, maintaining their historical significance for future generations.

Environmental Benefits:

Lime plaster is an eco-friendly material. The production of lime has a lower carbon footprint compared to modern cement-based products. Additionally, lime continues to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it cures, contributing to a reduction in overall greenhouse gases.
Types of Lime Plaster
Hydraulic Lime Plaster:
Made with hydraulic lime, which sets through a chemical reaction with water, making it suitable for damp conditions and exterior use.
Non-Hydraulic Lime Plaster:
Made with lime putty, which sets through carbonation (a reaction with carbon dioxide in the air). This type of plaster is softer and more flexible, ideal for interior use and delicate surfaces.

What is Lime Plastering?

Lime plastering involves the application of a lime-based mixture to walls and ceilings. This ancient technique has been used for thousands of years to finish and protect interior surfaces. Lime plaster is typically made from a blend of lime (either hydraulic or non-hydraulic), sand, and water. Traditional lime plaster can also include reinforcing fibers, such as animal hair, to improve its strength and adhesion.
Lime plastering is a vital technique in the conservation of historic buildings. Its breathability, compatibility with traditional materials, flexibility, durability, aesthetic value, and environmental benefits make it the preferred choice for preserving and restoring heritage structures. By using lime plaster, conservators can ensure the long-term health and beauty of these irreplaceable buildings, maintaining their historical significance for future generations.

Why Use Lime Plaster in Conservation?

Lime plaster is an essential material in the conservation of historic buildings due to its unique properties and benefits:

Breathability:

Lime plaster is highly breathable, allowing moisture to escape and evaporate from the structure. This is crucial for older buildings with solid walls that absorb moisture. Breathable materials help prevent damp problems by allowing trapped moisture to dissipate naturally, maintaining the structural integrity and health of the building.

Compatibility:

Lime plaster is compatible with the original materials used in historic buildings. Modern materials, like gypsum plaster, can be too rigid and non-breathable, leading to issues such as trapped moisture and decay. Lime plaster, on the other hand, works harmoniously with traditional masonry, ensuring long-term preservation.

Flexibility:

Non-hydraulic lime plaster is particularly soft and flexible, making it ideal for use on delicate or irregular surfaces commonly found in historic buildings. This flexibility helps accommodate the natural movements of the building without cracking or causing damage.

Durability:

When properly applied, lime plaster can last for many decades. Its durability and ability to be repaired and maintained with similar materials make it a sustainable choice for conservation work.

Protech Restoration & Construction are Restoration and Building specialists.

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At Protech Restoration & Construction we always try to use original or reclaimed stone in all our building projects, We are an independent business and source stone from many suppliers and quarries. Local to your location if required. Not only offering you be-spoke creations but also quality with no inflated cost.

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We are restoration work experts and are happy to discuss any project

Protech Restoration & Construction; Our Services

 

 

Conservation, Restoration, Re-pointing, Conservation Plaster work, Lime Rendering, Re-tooling and reworking stone, stonemasons, brick and stone cleaning, Chemical cleaning, Building Services. Specialists in Conservation, Restoration and Cleaning of Historic and Modern Building Facades, steam cleaning, low-pressure chalk cleaning, power washing, stone cleaning, stone restoration, brick cleaning, graffiti removal, anti-graffiti coatings, water-repellents, bird deterrents, nebulous spray systems, weed and root removal, Period Properties, Churches, Monuments, chipped granite, worktop crack, marble crack, granite worktop, pointing, stone chip repair, travertine, limestone, steps re-pointing, re-pointing, stone steps, steps repair, hearth, fireplace repair, stone restoration, chimney, granite steps, marble drilling, broken granite, broken marble, granite cutting, granite drilling, stone, marble cleaning, granite steps repair, fireplace restoration.

Protech Restoration & Construction; Our Service Areas

 

Dublin 1  Abbey Street, Amiens Street, Capel Street, Dorset Street, Henry Street and Mary Street, Mountjoy Square, Marlborough Street, North Wall, O'Connell Street, Parnell Square, and Talbot Street, Dublin 2  Merrion Square, Temple Bar, Grafton Street, Dame Street, Leeson Street and Wexford Street. St Stephen's Green,  Aungier Street , Camden Streets,  Dublin 3  Ballybough, North Strand, Clonliffe, Clontarf, Dollymount, East Wall,  East Point), Fairview, Killester, Marino, Dublin 4 Ballsbridge, Donnybrook, Irishtown, Merrion, Pembroke, Ringsend and Sandymout,Lansdowne Road, Dublin 5  Artane, Coolock, Harmonstown, Kilbarrack, Raheny., Dublin 6  Milltown, Ranelagh, Rathmines, Rathgar, Harold's Cross, Templeogue,  Terenure., Dublin 7  Arbour Hill, Broadstone, Cabra, Grangegorman, Phibsboro, Smithfield, Stoneybatter,
Dublin 8  Dolphin's Barn, Inchicore, Islandbridge, Kilmainham, Merchants Quay, Portobello, South Circular Road, The Coombe, Dublin 9  Ballymun east , Ballymun Road, Beaumont, Donnycarney, Drumcondra, Elm Mount, Griffith Avenue, Glasnevin (St Mobhi, Botanic Gardens and Met Éireann), Santry, and Whitehall, Dublin 10 Ballyfermot and Cherry Orchard,

Dublin 11 Ballymun west, Ballymun Road (Sillogue, Balcurris, Balbutcher, Poppintree, Sandyhill and Wadelai), Dubber Cross, Finglas (including Ballygall and Cappagh), most of Glasnevin (Cremore, Addison, Violet Hill, Finglas Road, Old Finglas Road and Glasnevin Cemetery), Kilshane Cross, The Ward and Coolquay, Dublin 12  Bluebell, Crumlin, Perrystown, Terenure, Drimnagh, and Walkinstown, Dublin 13 Baldoyle, Bayside, Donaghmede, Sutton, Howth and Ayrfield.  Dublin 14 Churchtown,  Clonskeagh,  Dundrum,  Goatstown, Rathfarnham and Windy Arbour, Dublin15 Blanchardstown,  Castleknock, Coolmine, Clonsilla, Corduff, Mulhuddart, Tyrrelstown, Clonee, Ongar,  Dublin16  Ballinteer, Ballyboden,  Kilmashogue,  Knocklyon  and Rockbrook, Dublin 17  Balgriffin, most of Coolock, and Belcamp, Darndale and Priorswood.  Dublin 18  Cabinteely, Carrickmines, Foxrock, Kilternan, Sandyford, Ticknock, Ballyedmonduff, Stepaside, and Leopardstown.  Dublin 20 Chapelizod, and Palmerstown,  Dublin 22 Clondalkin, Rowlagh, Quarryvale and Liffey Valley, and Neilstown, Dublin 24  Firhouse, Jobstown, and Tallaght, Kilnamanagh

Contact Hours:

Opening hours Monday to Friday, 9am to 6pm.
However, if you would like to contact us after these hours we would welcome your call.